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Cognition

Fortitude

We’ve written 3 blog posts about Fortitude. View all topics »

  1. Fortitude 101: Surviving Deadlines and Protecting Passions

    I should have an office pony. Something straight out of Thelwell, with a bushy mane as wide as its body, sparkly-painted hooves, and short enough to use as a portable laptop stand. I’m convinced that this should (and will) happen one day. Just ask my coworkers how often “little horses” come up in conversations with me.

    I have a long list of “shoulds.” Most are pony-delightful, but not all of them; some like to sneak in and push my limits—the devious suckers. Those shoulds are the kind that adore instilling doubt, delaying decisions, and convincing us we need to incessantly reach and achieve and exhaust. It takes guts to tackle that kind of should. They play the long game, and they always seem to crop up during tests of our fortitude. They love to mess with our heads.

  2. Targeting Twenty Twelve

    We Happy Coggers have much to look forward to in 2012. This year will see the launch of our longest-running, largest project ever. (Stay tuned.) We’ll be firmly rooting our stronghold in a brand new city, Austin, TX, perhaps eating some barbecue in the process. We’ve also moved into a new studio space in NYC, An Event Apart is in more cities than ever before, A Book Apart is publishing critical new thinking on the web industry, and A List Apart will be evolving as well.

  3. Patience and Fortitude

    A short dozen blocks north of Happy Cog’s New York studio, two famous stone lions sculpted by Edward Clark Potter guard the entrance to The New York Public Library at 42nd Street. The lions were originally named for the library’s private backers, the Astor and Lenox families. But in the 1930s, New York Mayor Fiorello La Guardia renamed the two lions “Patience” and “Fortitude,” because those were the qualities New Yorkers would need to survive the Great Depression. This was back in the days when elected officials gave a damn about the people, and when they could use a three-syllable word without fear that citizens would brand them as over-educated or French. But I digress.