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Development

We’ve written 29 blog posts about Development. View all topics »

  1. Cog 313 TM 1

    A Mountain of Unknown

    Headshot of Ben Carr

    5/13/21

    by Ben Carr

    The staggering pace of growth and change in tools, technologies, and capabilities is one of the most exciting and daunting aspects of the web. As a developer in client services, a critical component of my job has always involved learning what needs to be learned in order to allow our clients to understand and take advantage of the benefits of this pace. Whether it’s an unfamiliar codebase, a new framework, or new browser capabilities — new challenges are always on the horizon.

  2. Cognition 296 tm

    Monkey Patching in Craft

    Headshot of Rene Merino

    5/3/21

    by Rene Merino

    Craft CMS’ admin dashboard is very intuitive, while providing a lot of complex features and functionality. A great deal of this functionality depends on Craft's very own global variable (“Craft”) which extends Pixel & Tonic's GarnishJS UI Toolkit library.

  3. Hc blog v165 AS

    Best Uses of Laravel Vapor

    Headshot of Zach Smith

    3/22/21

    by Zach Smith

    As a Solutions Architect at Happy Cog, I often find myself in the weeds working with complex server architectural configurations in our clients’ AWS platforms. You may often find me setting up complex infrastructure by code with AWS Terraform, deploying fleets of EC2 instances powered by Continuous Integration pipelines, and working to curate complex load balancing solutions for our clients who receive unexpected bursts of views from our marketing campaigns (the list goes on).

  4. 5 Things Ive Learned About Tech Leadership 360x275

    5 Things I’ve Learned About Tech Leadership

    Headshot of Jeremy Gimbel

    11/25/19

    by Jeremy Gimbel

    Tech leadership is a mystery to many. As one racks up years of experience as a developer, there’s often an assumption that one must eventually move into tech leadership to continue to grow. And while this may be true, given the structure and hierarchy of the company you work for, the jump from individual contributor to tech leader isn’t always smooth. The two roles have some crossover in skills, but each also requires its own unique set of skills to get the job done as well.

  5. Entering the matrix 360x275

    Enter the Matrix

    Headshot of Andrew Kaslick

    9/20/19

    by Andrew Kaslick

    A few years ago, a fellow developer (Santiago Sosa) and I were brainstorming ways to foster our company culture when we came up with the idea to bring our developers together more often for informal discovery sessions. In the company’s early days, we were a fairly small and close-knit development team that usually had a decent idea of what everyone else was working on and what technologies everyone was using. However, as the team began to quickly grow, we realized that developers were working on a wide variety of projects and were bringing with them a diverse set of skills and knowledge that many other developers were unfamiliar with. Often, developers weren’t aware of all the exciting projects that others were involved with. We felt it would be an incredibly valuable opportunity for the team to share what they were working on with each other on a regular basis.

  6. Cog 286 DP

    Happy Cog Starter Files 2016

    Headshot of Allison Wagner

    5/13/16

    by Allison Wagner

    I have spent close to 7 years as a front-end developer at Happy Cog and in that time I’ve seen our discipline go through many great changes— from spacer gifs to responsive web design, we’ve all iterated quite a bit. This rate of change is one of the things I most love about frontend— the collaborative, communicative community that pushes us all forward whether we like it or not. As process has evolved, so too has it improved.

  7. Hc blog Main Article Illustration v162 AS

    My one true layout

    Headshot of Mark Huot

    11/6/15

    by Mark Huot

    Recently I’ve been “evangelizing” Docker quite a bit among the Happy Cog developers. Sometimes that sounds like “zomg, Mark really loves Docker” and other times it’s closer to “omg, why is he over engineering this again.” What I’ve been working on, lately, is a way to use Docker containers to re-implement a more flexible version of Heroku. The end goal is a workflow that starts with a developer pushing code. That code, regardless of branch, is published to a unique URL that anyone can see, regardless of their setup or environment.

  8. Hc blog Main Article Illustration v157 AS

    Gone zshin'

    Headshot of Dan Delauro

    10/1/15

    by Dan Delauro

    Terminal is one of the more powerful apps that comes pre-installed on the Mac. In a nut-shell (see what I did?), it’s an emulator for bash, which is a command processor that lets us interact directly with the UNIX-based operating system that makes the Mac go. As developers, designers and curious tinkerers alike, it’s safe to assume we all rely on it one way or another.

  9. Things I’ve Learned From Working With My First Web Team

    Headshot of Paul Phan

    8/20/15

    by Paul Phan

    For the last 6 months or so, I’ve had the privilege of completing an internship working as a developer for Happy Cog. Throughout my time working here, I learned about the strategy, artifacts, and processes of building a beautiful, user-focused, responsive website. I attended both internal and client project meetings, worked directly with the designers and developers, and built an understanding of design systems and the best practices for coding.

  10. Illo jr sc

    Structured Typography with Sass Maps

    Headshot of Stephen Caver

    3/19/15

    by Stephen Caver

    For each development project at Happy Cog, we start with a set of starter files. Much like HTML5 Boilerplate or other similar initiatives, it’s intended to get us going as quick as possible. In that spirit, I’ve been thinking about how to move the needle in that direction as far as possible. The trick is to do so without burdening development with too many constraints and limitations.